Trench Warfare In World War One – Live In Trenches


Trench Warfare In World War One

​Trench warfare is a kind of war where both battalions dug deep trenches. ​​These long trenches ensure defense against enemies. World War One trenches are several miles long. It was not possible for one side to approach the other side.

Trench Warfare In World War One
Trench Warfare In World War One

Trench Warfare And World War One

The Western front located in France in World War 1 was fiercely fought using trench warfare. The world war one started on June 28, 1914, and ended in 1918. During the latter part of 1914, both sides built huge trenches that stretch miles. They stretch from the North Sea, spreading France and Belgium. In the next three years, neither party needs to make much of the ground in the following three and a half years, i.e., from 1914 October to 1918 March.

As per the expectation, during World War 1, huge trench lines of approximately 2,490 were dug. Most of them were 3 meters deep and between 1 to 2 meters wide.

Digging Format

Soldiers usually dig the trenches in three methods – entrenching is the quick and easy method of digging trenches in straight into the ground. But while digging, the soldiers were open to the enemy fire. Also, the second method was extending them on one side, popular as sapping. It is a safe method but demands a lot of timing. Tunneling implies to digging a tunnel, followed by removing the roof to create branches after completion. This is a safe method of digging a trench. But, it is complicated.

The straight-line format was not much common for digging trenches. Trenches in a zig-zag pattern having multiple levels were the preferable method. Proper paths in the trenches between the levels ensure hassle-free movement of soldiers while fighting with the enemies.

The trenches generally had embankment on the top side with a barbed-wire fence. During World War 1, wooden beams and sandbags help to reinforce the trenches. Wooden boards cover the bottom sides of the trenches. These duckboards protect the feet of the soldiers from the water flowing in the trenches.

The trenches required constant repairing work to avoid erosion due to any worms weather and gunfire.

Near about 450 men have to work for 6 hours to build 250 British trenches.

Life In British trenches

Life in British trenches used to be quite challenging owing to the flood was during a bad season. Moreover, trenches used to be dirty with pests like lice, rats, and frogs. Wild rats were one of the significant problems. They ate the food of the soldiers as well as attack them while they slept.

Trench Warfare In World War One
Trench Warfare In World War One

Trench Fever was responsible for lice. It leads to itching problems along with headache, fever, bones, sore muscles, and joints.

Trench foot is a common health hazard among soldiers living in trenches. Bad weather and rain used to flood the trenches, making them muddy and bloggy. Sometimes, it even blocks the weapons, thus, making it difficult to move on the battlefield.

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